Frequently asked questions - Victorian Floods commencing 06 October 2022 (AGRN 1037)

Below is a list of frequently asked questions regarding the Victorian Floods commencing 06 October 2022 (AGRN 1037). If you require further assistance, please contact the Natural Disaster Financial Assistance (NDFA) team via ndfa@justice.vic.gov.au (External link)

Last updated: 28 November 2022

Councils notified for assistance under the Disaster Recovery Funding Arrangements (DRFA)

 

Which local government areas and alpine resorts have been notified for assistance?

There are 63 local government areas and one alpine resort that have been particularly impacted by the storm and flood event. Those notified for assistance under the DFRA are:

  • Alpine Shire
  • Ararat Rural City Council
  • Banyule City Council
  • Baw Baw Shire Council
  • Benalla Rural City
  • Boroondara Council
  • Brimbank City Council
  • Buloke Shire
  • Campaspe Shire
  • Cardinia Shire Council
  • Central Goldfields
  • City of Ballarat
  • City of Casey
  • City of Greater Bendigo
  • City of Greater Geelong
  • City of Greater Shepparton
  • Colac Otway Shire Council
  • Corangamite Shire
  • East Gippsland Shire Council
  • Falls Creek Resort
  • Gannawarra Shire
  • Glenelg Shire
  • Golden Plains Shire Council
  • Hepburn Shire
  • Hindmarsh Shire Council
  • Horsham Shire
  • Hume City Council
  • Indigo Shire Council
  • Latrobe City Council
  • Loddon Shire
  • Macedon Ranges Shire
  • Manningham City Council
  • Mansfield Shire
  • Maribyrnong City Council
  • Maroondah City Council
  • Melbourne City Council
  • Melton City Council
  • Mildura Rural City Council
  • Mitchell Shire Council
  • Moira Shire
  • Moonee Valley City
  • Moorabool Shire Council
  • Mornington Peninsula Shire Council
  • Mount Alexander Council
  • Moyne Shire
  • Murrindindi Shire
  • Nillumbik Shire Council
  • Northern Grampians
  • Pyrenees Shire
  • Rural City of Wangaratta
  • South Gippsland Shire Council
  • Southern Grampians Shire Council
  • Strathbogie Shire
  • Surf Coast Shire Council
  • Swan Hill Rural City Council
  • Towong Shire Council
  • Warrnambool City Council
  • Wellington Shire Council
  • West Wimmera Shire Council
  • Whittlesea Council
  • Wodonga Council
  • Wyndham City Council
  • Yarra Ranges Council
  • Yarriambiack Shire Council

Note: Additional LGAs may be added to the Commonwealth notification as LGAs advise of impacts.

October 2022 Flood Recovery clean-up program

The Victorian Government has announced that they are providing $150 million towards a coordinated clean-up program for the hardest hit areas of the October floods.

The clean-up program will assess damage to structures and provide detailed assessment reports. This program also offers the option of demolition for eligible structures that are damaged beyond repair.

Johns Lyng Group is the lead contractor for the clean-up program in partnerships with local councils. They will work to remove debris and hazards from nature strips, and collect rubbish in affected areas.

For more information or to register, please visit the Emergency Recovery Victoria website (External link) or call Emergency Recovery Victoria on 1800 560 760 (External link)

To support councils in managing the flood related debris our Clean-up of debris page outlines what elements of flood clean up can be claimed through the normal Category A and B DRFA process and what elements are able to be claimed under the recently announced October 2022 Flood Recovery Clean-up program.

The Council Flood Support Fund has also been established as an initial measure to provide immediate payments to local government areas that have experienced the most significant flood damage. Please visit the Council Flood Support Fund (External link) website for more details.

Required DRFA supporting documentation

 

What supporting documentation will be needed if using contract building surveyors and/or Environmental Health Officers to complete secondary impact assessments?

Invoices provided to councils by contractors will need to clearly state that the work undertaken relates to " Victorian Floods commencing 06 October 2022 (AGRN 1037)" and outline that the work is associated with completing damage assessments on private properties.

The claim will need to include:

  • the invoices showing which properties were inspected, and
  • damage reports for each inspected property with photos showing the link between the damage and the event.

Invoices for works conducted up until 30 June 2023 will need to be lodged by 31 July 2023. 

For more information on damage assessments please refer to:

For more information on supporting documentation required for contractors please see refer to:

 

What pre-condition evidence will a council need to provide?

Pre-disaster condition supporting documentation is required to establish a basis that the damage sustained was a direct result of an eligible event.  

No pre-disaster condition assessment is required when submitting an emergency works claim.

For Immediate and Reconstruction works the pre-disaster condition of an essential public asset can be demonstrated through one or more of the following means:

  • Pre-disaster photographic evidence, including details of latitude, longitude and date taken. It is recommended that the latest available data be adopted, but no older than 4 years before the eligible disaster for local government assets.
  • If pre-disaster photographic evidence is not available, a pre-disaster asset condition assessment report is required to be provided. This must be conducted or verified by a suitably qualified professional.
  • A suitably qualified professional may be defined as a person with undergraduate qualifications and a minimum of 5 years experience, and relevant certifications in the appropriate field of work for the asset type.
  • This evidence can be supported by other supplementary evidence that may include:
    ​​​​​​- satellite or aerial imagery that depicts pre-disaster condition of asset prior to being damaged, and 
    - maintenance records.

For more information, please see Damage Assessments for Essential Public Assets in Victorian DRFA Guideline 1.

 

What can a council do if the area they are photographing is remote and there is limited GPS capability to capture metadata?

Photographic supporting documentation is required to support a councils DRFA claim and show the extent of the damage to an eligible asset. Ideally a photo or video will include geospatial metadata of longitude, latitude and the date taken, as this is considered the strongest form of evidence to demonstrate post-disaster damage. 

If the geospatial metadata can not be embedded in the photo, the council is to raise this concern with their Assessor from Regional Roads Victoria who can verify the location of the damaged asset during a site visit. Photos will still be required with the location identified. The Department of Transport Assessor will verify this location during claim assessment and recommendation. 

When taking post-disaster photos, it is important to consider:

  • Photos should be clear, in colour and must contain geospatial metadata of longitude, latitude and date taken.
  • Close-up photos are encouraged. Close-up photos can be used to demonstrate the disaster damaged components to support the proposed treatment(s). 
  • The photos should identify the full extent of the damage. 
  • Take photos of the damage at each asset location. Make sure photos are a representation of the event damage sustained. The photos need to show consistent damage and variances in the degree of damage. 

What to avoid:

  • Photos that do not contain geospatial metadata of longitude, latitude and date taken as it is then difficult to ascertain the exact location of the damage (where possible).
  • Photos taken from inside the car through the windscreen.
  • Any objects that obscure the view of the damage (for example, structures, vehicles and people).
  • Photos with glare or dark shadows on the ground. These can obscure the view of the damage. 

For more information on photo requirements, please see Damage Assessments for Essential Public Assets in Victorian DRFA Guideline 1.

Council resourcing

 

How can a council seek approval for a Flood Recovery Support Officer Position Description to assist with undertaking eligible activities under Categories A and B?

The process for a council to seek approval for an additional position to assist with eligible activities under the DRFA is to contact their Department of Transport assessor, who will review the request and provide recommendations back to the NDFA team for approval of the role and activities.

Each activity to be included in this role will need to tie back to an eligible activity under Category A and/or B, for example:

  • the operation of a Relief or Recovery Centre (Recovery Centre Manager, or Recovery Centre Support Officer)
  • organising impact assessments on impacted private properties
  • coordination of counselling services for impacted individuals and households
  • project managing emergency or immediate works.

For more information, please visit Request for a Funded Position - Additional Temporary Employees.

For further information, please refer to:

 

What will a council need to provide if they have shared staff with another impacted council?

Use of other council’s staff to assist with relief and recovery activities

A disaster affected council (Council 1) can use the workforce of another non-disaster affected council (Council 2) in the same way they would engage an external contractor to undertake eligible DRFA works, on the following basis:

  • the workforce costs are extraordinary – that is, costs would not have been incurred if the disaster had not occurred
  • the activities the workforce from Council 2 are undertaking relate to the delivery of eligible DRFA activities/measures, and 
  • the workers from Council 2 are being paid by Council 1 and not paid by Council 2 to undertake the contracted works (the costs are incurred by Council 1).

Should a council use other non-disaster affected council staff to assist with eligible relief and recovery activities following a DRFA disaster:

  1. The impacted Council 1 should provide a purchase order and engagement agreement from Council 1 to Council 2, that is, an email trail requesting or agreeing to provide additional staff on particular dates for an eligible activity, for example, manning a relief centre.
  2. Council 2 should provide the corresponding invoice to Council 1 for services provided and include supporting documentation outlining the dates, and the activities undertaken by those particular staff.

For further information, refer to Victorian DRFA Guideline 3.

Note: a non-disaster council may also only be minorly impacted by these Victoria floods commencing 6 October 2022 and may have capacity to assist a more severely impacted council.

 

Can council staff claim expenses incurred while travelling to and from Recovery Centres (and other sites) with their private vehicles to assist with emergency works?

Private vehicle usage is eligible to be claimed under the DRFA.

Supporting documentation is required, such as:

  • the activity each staff member was undertaking (for example, assisting in the relief or recovery centre)
  • dates worked
  • private vehicle usage amount (this is calculated as per council staff private vehicle use policy).

For more information, refer to Victorian DRFA Guideline 3.

 

Can council seek reimbursement for costs associated with the purchase of road closure signs if they are unable to be hired?

If equipment such as road closure signs (for example, "water over roads") are unable to be hired and are required to be purchased, impacted councils may claim the cost of the purchase as an eligible expense so long as the purchase amount is less than that of the hire cost.

Appropriate evidence would need to be provided to demonstrate this is the most cost effective solution. If the purchase cost is more than the hire cost, the impacted council is able to claim equivalent hire costs for the equipment including operational costs if not covered by the hiring arrangement. If that equipment is issued in subsequent DRFA notified disasters, operating costs (for example, fuel, transportation) will be considered as eligible expenses.

DRFA allowable time limits

 

What is the process if a council has identified that they are unable to complete emergency or immediate works required within the 3 month time period allowed?

A council will need to discuss with their Assigned Assessor from Department of Transport if they are concerned whether the works required will not be completed within the 3 month period post access to the asset.

Step 1

An asset is determined as accessible when:

  • the disaster is no longer occurring (for example, flood waters have receded, or a bushfire is out/under control) and the site of the damaged asset can be safely accessed by surveyors, and/ or reconstruction workers, or
  • the council has capacity to undertake the required restoration works. In this situation, the council must be able to demonstrate that they have made a reasonable attempt to undertake works as soon as the disaster was no longer occurring (as per the point above) but was not able to complete the works because of:
    - competing reconstruction priorities associated with a significant program of works caused by a severe disaster or multiple disasters, or
    - the unavailability of specialised equipment/resources.

Step 2

The council in consultation with their Assessor are to complete a Request for an Extension of time period for Emergency and Immediate Works form 2 weeks prior to the end of the allowable time period.

Step 3

The NDFA team will review the extension of time request and discuss the outcome with the Assessor who will discuss the outcome with the council.

For more information, please refer to Emergency Works, Immediate Reconstruction works and Essential Public Assets Reconstruction work in Victorian DRFA Guideline 1.

Fallen or damaged trees

 

How can councils claim contractor costs to manage residential trees that are threatening to fall on properties?

Councils are required to provide supporting documentation that can clearly demonstrate how the debris is impacting the household's ability to return to live in their home. Supporting documentation must be provided for each residential property where works are to be carried out.

Supporting documentation could include:

  • photos clearly showing how the debris is impacting the ability for the household to live in their home including access being impeded, that is, the driveway, or
  • contractor invoice/s that can clearly identify:
    - the address of each residential property assisted
    - the location of the debris and how it is preventing the impacted household in returning to live in their home

Where photos or information on the actual property address is not available, documentation could include:

  • a flood map from the Incident Control Centre/State Control Centre/council outlining where flooding incurred in the local government area along with other information including but is not limited to:
    - representative photos on a sample basis
    - evacuation orders
    - SES call/incident logs, or
    - council customer service requests.

For more information, refer to Victorian DRFA Guideline 3.

The diagram below shows:

  • the residential area that is considered eligible for clean-up activities
  • the tree fall arc that shows eligible trees that would impact the primary access and/or primary residence and
  • the tree fall arc for ineligible trees that would not impact the primary access or primary residence if it fell.

The above diagram refers to the clean-up works undertaken by councils. However, for areas where a state coordinated clean-up has been announced to collect flood debris and waste from kerbsides (nature strips) or nominated locations, impacted residents are being advised to contact their local council to request waste collection assistance.

Waste may include:

  • green waste
  • hazardous materials
  • whitegoods
  • electrical waste, and
  • furnishings.

For more information on the Flood Clean-Up Program, please visit the Emergency Recovery Victoria website (External link)

 

What can council include in their DRFA claim if a gum tree is damaged but has not fallen down?

As the tree is still standing, the council will need to demonstrate that the tree:

  • is hazardous as a direct result of the event
  • poses an imminent threat of falling on houses, driveways or is impeding direct access. 

An arborist assessment and report is required to identify the address, hazard, cause, risk and recommended treatment. Photos of the tree and its likely impact on property if it were to fall should be included. 

Once the above requirements are met, council can engage a contractor to remove the trees and seek to claim reimbursement through the DRFA. 

For more information, refer to Victorian DRFA Guideline 3.

 

What can council do if there is a tree that has fallen into private land?

Some costs for removal of debris and temporary repairs to dwellings are eligible under DRFA, providing the following can be demonstrated:

  • Debris and damage are directly impacting the resident's ability to live in their home. For example, debris impeding access to the property.
  • Must be the principle place of residence. For example, the property cannot be a holiday house.
  • Supporting documentation is provided which demonstrates a link between the event, damage, impact to resident, works undertaken and cost incurred.
  • Each residence is treated separately. Photos must be able to show the extent of the damage and the impact is has on the residents' ability to stay in the property.
  • Works must be undertaken or engaged by council.
  • Contractor invoice descriptions must support the photo evidence, and be able to sufficiently describe the damage, impact and works undertaken

The following are not eligible under DRFA:

  • Cost to remove debris that has fallen outside the immediate vicinity of the dwelling and are not impeding access.
  • Damage to fences, sheds, swimming pools and holiday houses.
  • Claims made against council.

For more information, refer to Victorian DRFA Guideline 3.

 

Can costs related to trees that have fallen on road reserve fence lines be claimed?

Replacement of fencing on a road reserve is not considered an eligible cost under the DRFA.

For more information about removal of trees please refer to the question below.

For further information about assets that are not eligible under the DRFA, please refer to the Emergency Works section in Victorian DRFA Guideline 1.

 

Which flood and storm damaged trees on a road are eligible to be included?

Councils can claim costs associated with the removal of trees from eligible roads if:

  • the damaged trees are associated with an eligible disaster and a significant portion of the tree is impacting on the function of an essential public asset, and
  • the removal of damaged or dangerous trees are to make the essential public asset safe and functional.

Eligible roads include:

  • local government owned roads and road infrastructure.

Ineligible roads include:

  • roads that are privately owned, managed, or maintained, and
  • fire trails or access tracks.

The diagram below shows how a council can determine if a fallen tree is impacting on an essential public asset. The diagram shows:    

  • the road envelope (which includes the road, shoulders and batter) within the wider road reserve, and
  • the tree fall arc, which shows how a non-eligible tree would not impact the road envelope if it fell.

 

The diagram shows the road envelope (which includes the road, shoulders and batter) within the wider road reserve. It also shows the tree fall arc, which shows how a non-eligible tree would not impact the road envelope if it fell

 

For more information on the types of emergency works, please refer to the Emergency Works section in Victorian DRFA Guideline 1.

For further details on eligible and ineligible assets, please refer to Definition of Essential Public Assets in Victorian DRFA Guideline 1.

 

Can a council claim for clearing Fire Access Tracks?

Fire Access Trails or Fire Access Tracks are ineligible for any type of works under the DRFA.

Please refer to Definition of Essential Public Assets in Victorian DRFA Guideline 1 for examples of assets that are not eligible.

 

What happens if a subsequent weather event causes further damage to the area before the council can finish the clean up?

The NDFA team will review situation reports to determine if the 2 events are linked under the same weather system and whether or not they will be combined under one Australian Government Reference Number (AGRN).

The NDFA team will provide updates to Councils and Department of Transport as this work progresses.

Removal of debris on impacted residential properties including flood waste collection points/landfills

To support councils in managing the flood related debris our Clean-up of debris page outlines what elements of flood clean up can be claimed through the normal Category A and B DRFA process and what elements are able to be claimed under the recently announced October 2022 Flood Recovery Clean-up program.

The Council Flood Support Fund has also been established as an initial measure to provide immediate payments to local government areas that have experienced the most significant flood damage. Please visit the Council Flood Support Fund (External link) website for more details.

 

Can councils claim costs associated with flood related waste at flood waste collection points/landfills?

On 18 October 2022, the Environment Protection Agency announced that there will be no waste levy or gate fees at landfills accepting flood-affected waste from impacted local government areas until 31 December 2022.

Councils are able to offer a free flood waste collection point at their local Waste Centre and claim their costs under Category A of the DRFA (the net cost of the EPA waste levy/gate fee charge at these waste collection points), but the Council will need to be able to demonstrate that the debris being claimed for are directly associated to the floods as opposed to normal collection of household and/or green waste from residents. 

When lodging a claim councils need to record the actual address (at minimum street level address) from which the debris came from in an impacted local government are. 

If councils have not recorded sufficient details councils will need to work with their Department of Transport (DOT) Assessor to determine an apportionment approach.

Apportionment takes into account, normal household debris or flood related debris coming from other areas within the impacted local government area. This would involve evidence demonstrating the land use of the affected area (% of the township/community that is residential, parks/gardens/reserves or commercial). 

The % relating to parks/gardens/reserves or commercial is not eligible under Category A of the DRFA and will be considered ineligible for reimbursement. The claim is only to be for the direct cost incurred and not capture any indirect costs and margins.

Councils will need to provide: 

  • a flood map from the Incident Control Centre/State Control Centre/council outlining where flooding incurred in the local government area to support the nexus of this activity to the disaster
  • the demographic data which illustrates the land use of the area (residential, parks/gardens/reserves and commercial)
  • costs associated the expenditure incurred at the Waste Centre/Collection point excluding any indirect costs and margins, as well as
  • the apportionment approach agreed to with their DOT Assessor.
 

How can councils claim costs associated with the removal of disaster related debris on private properties by council employees (overtime) and/or council engaged contractors?

Councils are required to provide the following supporting documentation when seeking reimbursement for costs associated with the removal of debris from within the residential footprint of impacted private properties:

  • a flood map from the Incident Control Centre/State Control Centre/council outlining where flooding incurred in the local government area to support the nexus of this activity to the disaster, along with
  • contractor invoice/s that can clearly identify ​​that works were associated with the October floods (and ideally capturing AGRN 1037 Victoria October 2022 floods), the date works occurred, and the location (at minimum street level) where these works occurred. For example, October 2022 debris clean up on Smith Street, Rochester, 21 October 2022. Note: Where contract costs relate to a hazardous material clean-up such as asbestos, a hazard inspection report should also be provided.

Where council staff have undertaken the clean-up works, councils should provide approved timesheets/payroll reports/email trails that details the role and location of the employee undertaking these clean up works relating to the overtime being claimed for that employee.

Should flood mapping be unavailable, other information can be used including but not limited to the following:

  • representative photos on a sample basis
  • evacuation orders
  • SES call/incident logs, or
  • council customer service requests

For areas where a state coordinated clean-up has been announced to collect flood debris and waste from kerbsides (nature strips) or nominated locations, impacted residents are advised to contact their local council to request waste collection assistance.

Waste may include:

  • green waste
  • hazardous materials
  • whitegoods
  • electrical waste, and
  • furnishings.

For more information on the Flood Clean-Up Program, please visit the Emergency Recovery Victoria website (External link)

 

Can a council claim costs associated with a skip placed on an impacted street for residents to place their flood debris into?

Yes, Councils can seek reimbursement where they choose to provide a skip service on impacted streets so that impacted households can place their flood debris into. This includes a Council engaged contractor undertake the works on private properties, or a Council using their existing kerbside contractors  to collect the additional flood debris on nature strips.

Councils are required to provide the following supporting documentation when seeking reimbursement for these costs including:

  • a flood map from the Incident Control Centre/State Control Centre/council outlining where flooding incurred in the local government area to support the nexus of this activity to the disaster, along with
  • contractor invoice/s that can clearly identify ​​that works were associated with the October floods (and ideally capturing AGRN 1037 Victoria October 2022 floods), the date works occurred, and the location (at minimum street level) where these works occurred. For example, October 2022 debris clean up on Smith Street, Rochester, 21 October 2022.

Where Councils are using existing their kerbside contractors for additional services to collect flood debris in impacted areas, Councils will need to provide the following supporting documentation when seeking reimbursement for these costs:

  • a flood map from the Incident Control Centre/State Control Centre/Council outlining where flooding incurred in the local government area to support the nexus of this activity to the disaster, and
  • advice/information on the additional costs of the existing contractor undertaking the kerbside service including the street names that these additional/increased services have taken been undertaken on.

For areas where a state coordinated clean-up has been announced to collect flood debris and waste from kerbsides (nature strips) or nominated locations, impacted residents should contact their local council to request waste collection assistance.

Waste may include:

  • green waste
  • hazardous materials
  • whitegoods
  • electrical waste, and
  • furnishings.

For more information on the Flood Clean-Up Program, please visit the Emergency Recovery Victoria website (External link)

Relief and recovery

 

Can councils provide food to community members through their community houses, community hubs or drop-in centres? How long can a council continue to provide this service?

The costs of food is eligible to be claimed under Category A for the establishment of a relief and or recovery centre.

Impacted councils can choose to use a community house, community hub or drop-in centre in the same function as a relief and recovery centre.

The DRFA claim will need to be supported with the following supporting documentation:

  • dates of when the facility was opened and when it was closed
  • dates of when residents experienced power outages
  • number of meals prepared
  • approximate number of residents the facility is providing catering for
  • approximate number of residents impacted by this event.

For more information, refer to Relief and Recovery Expenditure in Victorian DRFA Guideline 3.

 

A council has been holding a community debrief in a relief hub which may or may not transition to a recovery hub. Is this activity eligible?

A community relief hub is considered to be operating as a recovery centre and eligible costs will be able to be claimed under Category A of the DRFA however, please note that not all impacted councils will need a community relief hub or recovery centre to be established.

For more information, please refer to Relief and Recovery Expenditure in Victorian DRFA Guideline 3.

 

Can an impacted council claim the expenses related to laying crushed rock in the car park, where they have set up portable showers and hot meals for impacted residents?

As the damage has occurred as a direct result of providing emergency assistance to impacted individuals (via the operation of community hubs and drop-in centres which are acting as relief centres), this is eligible as a counter disaster operation under Category A of the DRFA.

For more information, refer to Relief and Recovery Expenditure in Victorian DRFA Guideline 3.

Other

 

Can council organise a specialised pump truck or purchase portable generators to support residents with maintaining their septic systems that have been flooded in the event?

Cleaning and refilling residential septic tanks to make them operational, is eligible under Category A: Counter Disaster Operation of the DRFA, therefore the Council can hire or externally contract in resources for this activity.

The purchase of equipment is ineligible under the DRFA. However, where equipment (such as emergency generators) are required to be purchased as they are unable to be hired, and the purchase amount is less than that of the hire cost, impacted councils may claim the cost of the purchase as an eligible expense.

Appropriate evidence would need to be provided to demonstrate this is the most cost effective solution. If the purchase cost is more than the hire cost, the impacted council is able to claim equivalent hire costs for the equipment including operational costs if not covered by the hiring arrangement. If that equipment is issued in subsequent DRFA notified disasters, operating costs (fuel, transportation) will be considered as eligible expenses.

Impacted residents may be eligible to apply for an emergency generator. For more information visit the Victorian Energy website (External link)

For further information, refer to Counter Disaster Operations in Victorian DRFA Guideline 3.

 

Can councils claim costs associated with sandbagging and/or the construction of portable levees/ flood barriers to prevent inundation of residential properties or a central business district under Categories A and B of the DRFA?

Yes, Councils can claim costs associated with sandbagging and/or the construction of portable levees/flood barriers to prevent inundation of residential properties under Category A: Counter Disaster Operations of the DRFA. Decommissioning costs are also eligible for reimbursement.

Councils can also claim costs associated with sandbagging (including the hiring of machines to fill sandbags necessary to prevent damage to communities, such as, to protect residential areas, public schools and public hospitals) and/or the construction/decommissioning of portable levees/ flood barriers to prevent inundation of central business districts or parts of towns under Category B: Counter Disaster Operations of the DRFA.

Supporting documentation could include:

  • Contractor invoice/s that can clearly identify ​​​that works were associated with the October floods (and ideally capturing AGRN 1037 Victoria October 2022 floods), the date works occurred, and the location (at minimum street level) where these works occurred. For example, October 2022 debris clean up on Smith Street, Rochester, 21 October 2022).
  • A flood map from the Incident Control Centre/State Control Centre/Council outlining where flooding incurred in the local government area along with other information including but is not limited to:
    - representative photos on a sample basis
    - evacuation orders
    - SES call/incident logs, or
    - council customer service requests.

For more information, refer to Victorian DRFA Guideline 3.

 

Is there any assistance available for councils to claim costs not covered under the DRFA?

Yes, support has been made available by Local Government Victoria under a Council Flood Support Fund (External link) to provide immediate payments of $500,000 to impacted local government areas that have experienced the most profound flood damage.

This funding will ensure those councils have the immediate funding they need to start clean-up activities, and importantly help restore local facilities and services that are the lifeblood of regional communities, like sports clubs and community centres.

Clean-up activities supported through the fund include the collection and removal of debris deposited on council parks, reserves and community assets, transportation costs, staffing and restoration of community services.

Councils should refer to the Local Government Victoria website (External link) for more information.

 

How can council notify Emergency Management Victoria that they have been impacted by the recent storm event?

Complete the Notification of an Event form for the event ‘Victorian Floods commencing 06 October 2022'

Submit the form by emailing it to ndfa@justice.vic.gov.au (External link) as soon as possible.

For more information, visit Disaster Recovery Funding Arrangements (DRFA) - for events post 1 November 2018.